Legion of Honor
One of the most significant collections of impressionist art that Ailsa Mellon Bruce acquired and ultimately gifted to the National Gallery of Art originally belonged to the fashion designer Edward Molyneux. The couturier’s collection included such jewels as Vuillard’s The Yellow Curtain (pictured here) and Renoir’s tender portrait of Madame Monet and her son, both of which are currently on view in Intimate Impressionism. Additionally, we hold two Molyneux gowns in our permanent collection.

One of the most significant collections of impressionist art that Ailsa Mellon Bruce acquired and ultimately gifted to the National Gallery of Art originally belonged to the fashion designer Edward Molyneux. The couturier’s collection included such jewels as Vuillard’s The Yellow Curtain (pictured here) and Renoir’s tender portrait of Madame Monet and her son, both of which are currently on view in Intimate Impressionism. Additionally, we hold two Molyneux gowns in our permanent collection.

“I always start a painting with the sky.” Alfred Sisley’s perfect painting of spring, Meadow, is now on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art.Alfred Sisley (French, 1839 —1899), Meadow, 1875. oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection

“I always start a painting with the sky.” Alfred Sisley’s perfect painting of spring, Meadow, is now on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art.

Alfred Sisley (French, 1839 —1899), Meadow, 1875. oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection

For better or worse, it’s tax day. The theme of money collecting has played a prominent role in the history of art, as evinced in Peter Paul Rubens’ The Tribute Money, on view in Gallery 14. In this scene from the New Testament, Rubens depicts Christ addressing the Pharisees, who question if it is lawful to pay taxes. Calling attention to Caesar’s image and an inscription on a coin, Jesus responds, “Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” Peter Paul Rubens (Flemish, 1577–1640). The Tribute Money, ca. 1612. Oil on wood panel. Museum purchase, M.H. de Young Art Trust Fund. 44.11

For better or worse, it’s tax day. The theme of money collecting has played a prominent role in the history of art, as evinced in Peter Paul Rubens’ The Tribute Money, on view in Gallery 14. In this scene from the New Testament, Rubens depicts Christ addressing the Pharisees, who question if it is lawful to pay taxes. Calling attention to Caesar’s image and an inscription on a coin, Jesus responds, “Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” 

Peter Paul Rubens (Flemish, 1577–1640). The Tribute Money, ca. 1612. Oil on wood panel. Museum purchase, M.H. de Young Art Trust Fund. 44.11

Today is slowartday! Join us onsite for special docent-led tours and dedicated discussion groups that emphasize slow and thoughtful art-viewing.
Or join us online with this instagram challenge: look at an artwork for 10 minutes. Pick out a detail and take a picture. Post it on Instagram and tag @legionofhonor #slowartday. Be sure to share why the detail caught your eye in the first place. Happy looking!
Konstantin Makovsky (Russian, 1839–1915). The Russian Bride’s Attire (detail), 1889. Oil on canvas. Bequest of M.H. de Young. 53161

Today is slowartday! Join us onsite for special docent-led tours and dedicated discussion groups that emphasize slow and thoughtful art-viewing.

Or join us online with this instagram challenge: look at an artwork for 10 minutes. Pick out a detail and take a picture. Post it on Instagram and tag @legionofhonor #slowartday. Be sure to share why the detail caught your eye in the first place. Happy looking!

Konstantin Makovsky (Russian, 1839–1915). The Russian Bride’s Attire (detail), 1889. Oil on canvas. Bequest of M.H. de Young. 53161

slowartday:

Top Image: Martin van Meytens, Wedding Super, 1763

Bottom Images: Wedding Supper in detail

Notice the details tomorrow at Slow Art Day being hosted in your neck of the woods! Slow Art Day is an international event, so check out our list of venues!

hyperallergic:

Tomorrow (Saturday, April 12) is Slow Art Day.

The concept: Look at five artworks for 10 minutes each, then meet and discuss. GO!

This Saturday, April 12 is slowartday ! Join us for a variety of activities designed to encourage slow and thoughtful art viewing, including docent-led tours and designated discussion groups. 
Plus, we have an instagram challenge for you! Look at an artwork for 10 minutes. Pick out a detail and ‘gram it with the tag @legionofhonor #slowartday. Be sure to tell us why it stood out to you!Did you know that photography is allowed in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art? Get up close and personal with impressionist masterpieces and tell us what you see! Alfred Sisley (French, 1839—1899), Meadow (detail), 1875. oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection

This Saturday, April 12 is slowartday ! Join us for a variety of activities designed to encourage slow and thoughtful art viewing, including docent-led tours and designated discussion groups. 

Plus, we have an instagram challenge for you! Look at an artwork for 10 minutes. Pick out a detail and ‘gram it with the tag @legionofhonor #slowartday. Be sure to tell us why it stood out to you!

Did you know that photography is allowed in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art? Get up close and personal with impressionist masterpieces and tell us what you see! 

Alfred Sisley (French, 1839—1899), Meadow (detail), 1875. oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection

Come “face to face with an imagination by turns and sometimes almost simultaneously analytic, anarchic, and outrageous” in Matisse from SFMOMAnow on view!

Andrew W. Mellon and his children, Ailsa and Paul, together amassed one of the country’s greatest collections of art, which ultimately served as the foundations of the National Gallery of Art, and is featured in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art, now on view.

One of the many art dealers with whom the Mellons worked closely was none other than Joseph Duveen, who sold the Salon Doré to Richard Rheem. In 1959, Rheem gifted to the 18th-century French period room to the Legion of Honor. After an exhaustive conservation and renovation project, the Salon Doré from the Hôtel de La Trémoille finally re-opens tomorrow, April 5!

Join us this weekend for the momentous re-opening of the Salon Doré from the Hôtel de La Trémoille! For the past 18 months, this 18th-century period room has been closed for a comprehensive conservation, restoration, and renovation project. Now restored to its original glory and purpose, the Salon Doré from the Hôtel de La Trémoille returns and to reprise its role as one of the jewels of our permanent collection.
The opening day symposium is SOLD OUT, but will be live streamed on our website.

Join us this weekend for the momentous re-opening of the Salon Doré from the Hôtel de La Trémoille! For the past 18 months, this 18th-century period room has been closed for a comprehensive conservation, restoration, and renovation project. Now restored to its original glory and purpose, the Salon Doré from the Hôtel de La Trémoille returns and to reprise its role as one of the jewels of our permanent collection.

The opening day symposium is SOLD OUT, but will be live streamed on our website.