Legion of Honor
We found Matisse’s #Womancrushwednesday. “The artist transformed his sitter from a woman of ordinary human physiognomy into an idealized object of adoration.” –Janet Bishop, Curator of painting and sculpture at SFMOMA.
 
 Sarah Stein, 1916. Oil on canvas. On view in Matisse from SFMOMA.

We found Matisse’s #Womancrushwednesday. “The artist transformed his sitter from a woman of ordinary human physiognomy into an idealized object of adoration.” –Janet Bishop, Curator of painting and sculpture at SFMOMA.

 

Sarah Stein, 1916. Oil on canvas. On view in Matisse from SFMOMA.

Happy Birthday to Gustave Caillebotte who was born on this day in 1848. Today we celebrate and sail away with Caillebotte’s Regatta at Argenteuil (Régates à Argenteuil), 1893. Oil on canvas. Private collection.

 

 

 

Happy Birthday to Gustave Caillebotte who was born on this day in 1848. Today we celebrate and sail away with Caillebotte’s Regatta at Argenteuil (Régates à Argenteuil), 1893. Oil on canvas. Private collection.

 

 

 

Is this what your Monday feels like? 
Oscar Quesada, The Resurgence of the Legion, 1995, Oil on canvas.

Is this what your Monday feels like?

Oscar Quesada, The Resurgence of the Legion, 1995, Oil on canvas.

fineartsmuseumssf:

#Beautyspot in #SF.  Iain Baxter, Golden Gate Bridge from the set, Reflected San Francisco Beauty Spots, 1979. Photo etching with Aquatint Printed in Pink. #ggbridge

fineartsmuseumssf:

#Beautyspot in #SF. Iain Baxter, Golden Gate Bridge from the set, Reflected San Francisco Beauty Spots, 1979. Photo etching with Aquatint Printed in Pink. #ggbridge

fineartsmuseumssf:

July celebrates not only the birth of the American nation, but also that of many notable artists from various time periods and artistic movements. As the month draws to a close, here’s a quick look at some important figures and their works which have passed through the galleries of the de Young and Legion of Honor.

July 9th: David Hockney (1937)

image

Image courtesy of © David Hockney

The de Young presented David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition, from October 26, 2013 through January 20, 2014. Assembled by Hockney exclusively for the de Young, this exhibition marked the return to California of the most influential and best-known British artist of his generation.

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In a letter to Ailsa Mellon Bruce, whose birthday is today, the second director of the National Gallery of Art John Walker wrote, “It is difficult to know how to thank you for your generosity to the Gallery. Perhaps if I told you that your support has meant more to me than anything else that has occurred in my professional life this might convey some idea of how much I appreciate what you have done. I hope it gives you some satisfaction to know that your father, I feel sure, would be pleased with the first twenty-five years of the institution he established. You, more than anyone else, have made possible its growth and future development.”

Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art, on view now, features several key works from the Mellon Family collection. 

“I do not belong to any school, I simply want to do something that is personal to my self.” –Edouard Vuillard
Vuillard, who died on this day in 1940, is known for his intimate portrayals of interior life, which often feature women. This painting probably depicts the bedroom of the artist’s mother in the family apartment on rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, where she and the artist lived between 1891 and 1896. On view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art.
Edouard Vuillard (French, 1868-1940). The Yellow Curtain, c. 1893. Oil on canvas. Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection. National Gallery of Art

“I do not belong to any school, I simply want to do something that is personal to my self.” –Edouard Vuillard

Vuillard, who died on this day in 1940, is known for his intimate portrayals of interior life, which often feature women. This painting probably depicts the bedroom of the artist’s mother in the family apartment on rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, where she and the artist lived between 1891 and 1896. On view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art.

Edouard Vuillard (French, 1868-1940). The Yellow Curtain, c. 1893. Oil on canvas. Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection. National Gallery of Art

You may remember that Argenteuil featured prominently in last summer’s special exhibition Impressionists on the Water, which is why we’re featuring Claude Monet’s depiction of the sea town, currently on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art, as today’s #throwbackthursday post. 
Monet moved to Argenteuil in 1871. In this work, the artist alludes to the town’s dual industries of leisure and labor, depicting pleasure boats floating on the Seine while factory smokestacks rise in the distance. Above all, Monet revels in the afternoon sunlight streaming through the trees, which he paints in pink and yellow stripes across the shore. 
Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926). Argenteuil, ca. 1872. Oil on canvas. Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection. National Gallery of Art. 1970.17.42

You may remember that Argenteuil featured prominently in last summer’s special exhibition Impressionists on the Water, which is why we’re featuring Claude Monet’s depiction of the sea town, currently on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art, as today’s #throwbackthursday post. 

Monet moved to Argenteuil in 1871. In this work, the artist alludes to the town’s dual industries of leisure and labor, depicting pleasure boats floating on the Seine while factory smokestacks rise in the distance. Above all, Monet revels in the afternoon sunlight streaming through the trees, which he paints in pink and yellow stripes across the shore. 

Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926). Argenteuil, ca. 1872. Oil on canvas. Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection. National Gallery of Art. 1970.17.42

Argenteuil is one of the most frequently depicted locales in impressionist art. When Alfred Sisley visited Monet there in 1872, the two artists stood together to paint the boulevard Héloïse, one of the town’s main streets. Throughout the 1870s, the Impressionists often worked side by side, engaging in shared investigations of the world around them. 
Now on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art. 
Alfred Sisley (French, 1839–1899). Boulevard Héloïse, Argenteuil, 1872. Oil on canvas. Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.82. National Gallery of Art

Argenteuil is one of the most frequently depicted locales in impressionist art. When Alfred Sisley visited Monet there in 1872, the two artists stood together to paint the boulevard Héloïse, one of the town’s main streets. Throughout the 1870s, the Impressionists often worked side by side, engaging in shared investigations of the world around them. 

Now on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art

Alfred Sisley (French, 1839–1899). Boulevard Héloïse, Argenteuil, 1872. Oil on canvas. Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.82. National Gallery of Art

Happy Father’s Day!
Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917). Portrait of a Man, ca. 1864. Oil on canvas. Memorial gift from Dr. T. Edward and Tullah Hanley, Bradford, Pennsylvania. 69.30.43. Currently on view in Gallery 17.

Happy Father’s Day!

Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917). Portrait of a Man, ca. 1864. Oil on canvas. Memorial gift from Dr. T. Edward and Tullah Hanley, Bradford, Pennsylvania. 69.30.43. Currently on view in Gallery 17.